Port Coquitlam

Port Coquitlam is a city in British Columbia, Canada. Located 27 km (17 mi) east of Vancouver, it sits at the confluence of the Fraser River and the Pitt River. Coquitlam borders it on the north, the Coquitlam River borders it on the west, and the city of Pitt Meadows lies across the Pitt River. Port Coquitlam is almost entirely bisected by Lougheed Highway. Port Coquitlam is often referred to as "PoCo."[citation needed] It is Canada's 88th largest city by population. The area was first inhabited by the Coast Salish people, including the Kwikwetl'em people. The first European settlers began farming beside the Pitt River in 1859. A major impetus to the creation of a municipality was when the Canadian Pacific Railway moved its freight terminus from Vancouver to "Westminster Junction", where a spur line branched off to the Fraser River port of New Westminster in 1911. Port Coquitlam was first incorporated as a municipality on March 7, 1913. Port Coquitlam was originally mostly farmland; however, because of the densification and expansion of Vancouver, it has now become mostly suburban housing, especially in the northern and southwestern areas of the city. The economy has diversified with a variety of industrial and commercial developments, including metal fabrication, high technology industries, and transportation. Port Coquitlam is not to be confused with the adjacent and larger
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Kitsilano

In the 1960s, beachside Kitsilano was Vancouver's hippy hangout, drawing comparisons to San Francisco's Haight-Ashbury. Today, Kitsilano still has plenty of culture, but its apartments and houses are now occupied by young urban professionals and families who enjoy a modern version of that relaxed atmosphere – this is the birthplace of global yoga brand, Lululemon Athletica. Just over the Burrard Bridge from the downtown peninsula, the neighbourhood brings together a collection of attractions, beach and parks, residential streets, and a couple of main commercial districts. “Kits,” as it’s known locally, is bordered by the waterfront to the north and West 16th Ave to the south; Burrard Street to the east and Alma Street to the west. Most of the commercial activity is along West 4th Avenue and West Broadway, but you’ll also find shops and restaurants in the areas close to the beach. From Burrard Bridge, look north and you’ll glimpse a large waterfront greenspace known as Vanier Park. This spot is home to some of Vancouver’s best family-friendly attractions including the Museum of Vancouver, H.R. MacMillan Space Centre, and the Vancouver Maritime Museum, as well as being the venue for the Bard on the Beach Shakespeare festival from June to September each year. Continue along the waterfront and you’ll hit Kitsilano Beach, which is a hotspot during summer, complete with volleyball tournaments, picnicking families, lots of the beautiful people on parade, and the
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West Point Grey

Time magazine once described Vancouver as a jewel set between snow-covered mountains and deep Pacific Ocean inlets, and it’s hard to disagree. But for the Musqueam people of Ee’yullmough, the community that originally sat on the bluffs overlooking the Strait of Georgia, the peninsula was known as the “Battleground of the West Wind.” Here was the landmark dividing the territory of the Musqueam from those of the Squamish people. To this day, the winds sweeping over the peninsula bring a mix of weather across the bluffs separating the Fraser River from Burrard Inlet. The bluffs also offer a natural terracing that provides a range of exquisite views of the North Shore mountains and the jewel-box towers of the downtown core. Vancouver may be a jewel, but it’s one best admired from Point Grey. The community, which extends west from Alma Street to Pacific Spirit Regional Park and the University Endowment Lands, and north from West 16th Avenue to the beaches bordering English Bay, has long conceived of itself as set apart. Named for Captain George Grey, a friend of Captain George Vancouver, Point Grey was its own municipality from 1908 to 1929, when it amalgamated with Vancouver. The historic shopping district along West 10th Avenue between Discovery and Tolmie streets remains intact, yet in a state of constant renewal. Time-loved stores sit by new residential blocks, with their own additions to the retail streetscape. While it’s one of the most exclusive
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Yaletown

Vancouver is a major West coast city of British Columbia, Canada.
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West End

Vancouver is a major West coast city of British Columbia, Canada.
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Sunset

Vancouver is a major West coast city of British Columbia, Canada.
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Renfrew-Collingwood

Vancouver is a major West coast city of British Columbia, Canada.
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Mount Pleasant

Vancouver is a major West coast city of British Columbia, Canada.
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Knight

Vancouver is a major West coast city of British Columbia, Canada.
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Killarney

Vancouver is a major West coast city of British Columbia, Canada.
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Fraserview

Vancouver is a major West coast city of British Columbia, Canada.
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Fraser

Vancouver is a major West coast city of British Columbia, Canada.
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